Chemical Society of Washington

CSW November Dinner Meeting Thursday, November 16

Date:         Thursday, November 16
Time:         6:00 p.m. social hour, 7:00 p.m. Presentation
Location:    ACS Headquarters, Marvel Hall
                  1155 16th Street, N.W. - Washington, DC

Application of a Computer-Assisted Structural Elucidation Program for the Structural Determinations of a new Terpenoid Aldehyde and Two Monosulfated Maitotoxins

Eugene P. Mazzola was born on Feb. 2, 1942 in Montclair, New Jersey.  He obtained an A.B. degree in 1964 from Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, PA and a Ph.D. degree in 1971 in Organic Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh.  From 1970-72, he was a postdoctoral fellow with Professor Harold Goldwhite at the California State University, Los Angeles, applying NMR spectroscopy to dynamic systems in organophosphorus compounds.  He joined the old Bureau of Foods of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in Washington, DC in 1972 and took charge of the Bureau’s NMR Facility in 1973, a position that he held until 2015.

 

His research has focused primarily on the structural elucidation of natural product food contaminants and food colorant manufacturing impurities by NMR spectroscopy.  He has taught numerous NMR courses and workshops and has served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry since 1996.  He has been a member of the Organizing Committees of the Washington Area NMR Group since 1996 and the Small Molecule NMR Conference since 1999.  He is Adjunct Professor of Chemistry at the University of Maryland and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and co-author of the NMR text, "Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy:  An Introduction to Theory, Applications, and Experimental Methods."

Menu: Meal will be catered by VIPS Catering:  Grilled chicken with artichokes, capers & tomatoes, served with home style mushroom ravioli topped with basil marinara sauce, including Grilled Asparagus spears with lemon oil, Garden salad, rolls, cookies/brownies

Vegetarian Option: Four Cheese Vegetarian lasagna, garden salad, garlic break, cookies/brownies

RSVP by Noon Tuesday, November 14 - csw@acs.org  or by phone (messages only: 202-659-2650).  Please provide the names in your party, your company affiliation (if one), and if you want the vegetarian option when you RSVP.  The public is invited to attend.  You may attend the talk only, but reservations are appreciated.

If you need any further information or would like to make a reservation, please contact the CSW office by email at csw@acs.org  or by voicemail at 202.659.2650

Parking:  Parking is available in nearby commercial parking garages. Please be aware that garage closing times vary. Parking is also available on the street after 6:30 pm, but be aware that most parking meters are in effect until 10:00 pm and may be limited to 2 hours. You should check the individual meters for details and payment methods as some are no longer coin-operated.

Metro: Blue/Orange/Silver Line: McPherson Square or Farragut West. Red Line: Farragut North.

CSW/WCDG Joint Meeting, Wednesday, October 18, 2017

The next CSW Meeting will be a joint meeting with Washington Chromatography Discussion Group (WCDG) on Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Location:
Marvel Hall / ACS Headquarters
1155 16th St., NW, Washington, DC 20036

Presentation:
Dr. John Hanover
Chief, Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology, NIDDK
National Institutes of Health

CSW May Dinner Meeting, Thursday, May 11

Date:        Thursday, May 11

Time:  
      6:00 p.m. Check-in and social hour
                 6:30 p.m. Dinner
                 7:15 p.m. Presentation

Cost: 
       $24 (Members and guests) / $12 (Students)

Location:
  ACS Headquarters, Marvel Hall
                1155 16th St., N.W., Washington, DC 

Menu:       Filet Steak Diane (filet of beef topped with a classic cognac and mustard sauce,                  served with roasted potatoes, garden salad, and Artisan bread.

                 VEGETARIAN OPTION: Cheese Manicotti served with grilled vegetables,
                  tossed Salad and garlic bread.                                                                            
                  DESSERT: Cream Cheese and Sugar Topped Cupcakes (vanilla and chocolate)

_______________________________________________

 

RSVP by noon Tuesday, May 9: csw@acs.org or by phone (messages only: 202-659-2650)
Please provide the names in your party when you RSVP and indicate if you prefer the vegetarian option. The public is invited to attend. You may attend the talk only, but reservations are appreciated. Those who make a dinner reservation, but are unable to attend, should send a check for the cost of their meal to the CSW office.

Further details and directions can be found on the Capital Chemist website, http://www.capitalchemist.org

If you need any further information or would like to make a reservation, please contact the CSW office by email at csw@acs.org or by voicemail at 202.659.2650

Parking:  Parking is available in nearby commercial parking garages. Please be aware that garage closing times vary. Parking is also available on the street after 6:30 pm, but be aware that most parking meters are in effect until 10:00 pm and may be limited to 2 hours. You should check the individual meters for details and payment methods as some are no longer coin-operated.

Metro: Blue/Orange/Silver Line: McPherson Square or Farragut West. Red Line: Farragut North

________________________________________________

 

Gene Peters is Chief of Counterterrorism and Forensic Science Research at the FBI Laboratory.  In this capacity, he leads a team of full-time research staff to develop new capabilities, improve existing methods, and strengthen the scientific foundations of forensic analyses.

Prior to joining the FBI, he was a senior scientist and manager at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, where he led the scientific and performance analysis of the proposed national spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  His role included leading all research, development, and operational evaluation by teams examining the performance of systems at Yucca Mountain over a 1 million year performance period.  These teams evaluated the performance of engineered systems, which included corrosion and structural performance, and natural systems, which included climate change, structural geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry, and a probabilistic analysis of risk and consequences from system failure, in terms of radiochemistry and health physics.

____________________________________________

 

Title: Scientific Analyses of the Proposed Spent Nuclear Fuel Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

The U.S. generates approximately 20% of its electrical power using nuclear energy.  While nuclear power has many advantages in terms of limiting CO2 emissions, it does generate a stream of highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel that must be managed.  The national management strategy is based on geologic disposal and has a long and complicated history, most of which centers on the selected repository site – Yucca Mountain, located in southwestern Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site.  The Yucca Mountain project is unique for its Congressional involvement, controversial site selection process, and truly fascinating array of scientific and technical challenges.  This topic is very timely, given the new administration’s interest in reviving the YM project, which had been administratively halted in 2010, as well as changes in Congressional leadership – which has had an intimate influence on YM in the past.  We will cover, very briefly, the legislative history as it informs the scientific analysis, and focus on the scientific challenges, controversies, issues, and potential solutions that have dominated the YM project throughout its history.  Chemistry-centric issues include the influence of aqueous and deliquescence chemistry on corrosion of various alloys and fuel elements, the geochemistry of natural systems, and potential radiochemical exposure pathways, all in a fully probabilistic framework.

CSW April Dinner Meeting,Thursday, April 27

Date:  Thursday, April 27, 2017

Time:  6:00 p.m. - Check-in and social hour
           6:30 p.m. - Dinner
           7:15 p.m. - Presentation
 

Cost:  $18.00  Members / Guests
          $  9.00  Students

Location:   ACS Headquarters, Marvel Hall
                  1155 16th St., N.W., Washington, DC 
 

Menu:   Meal will be catered by M.K. Catering, featuring:

Southern Fried Chicken - spiced breaded chicken, white gravy mashed potatoes
Vegetarian Option (gluten-free): Penne - roasted zucchini, sweet peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, lemon-garlic sauce; Meal includes seasonal greens with house dressing, bread/butter, heavenly cookies, and beverage.

RSVP by noon on April 25, 2017, to csw@acs.org or by phone 202-659-2650 (messages only). Please provide the names in your party when you RSVP and let us know if you want the vegetarian option. The public is invited to attend. You may attend the talk only, but reservations are appreciated. Those who make a dinner reservation, but are unable to attend, should send a check for the cost of their meal to the CSW office.

Further details and directions can be found on the Capital Chemist website, http://www.capitalchemist.org

If you need any further information or would like to make a reservation, please contact the CSW office by email - csw@acs.org - or by voicemail - 202.659.2650.


Parking:  Parking is available in nearby commercial parking garages. Please be aware that garage closing times vary. Parking is also available on the street after 6:30 pm, but be aware that most parking meters are in effect until 10:00 pm and may be limited to 2 hours. You should check the individual meters for details and payment methods as some are no longer coin-operated.

Metro: Blue/Orange/Silver Line: McPherson Square or Farragut West. Red Line: Farragut North.

________________________________________________

 

Richard E. Engler, Ph.D.    

Senior Chemist with Bergeson & Campbell

"TSCA and TSCA Reform"

Abstract: The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) was the last of the major environmental statutes to be reformed. After more than a decade of discussion and effort, TSCA reform became a reality when President Obama signed the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act (Lautenberg) on June 22, 2016. Lautenberg made a number of significant changes to TSCA, but left the fundamental underlying structure intact.  We will discuss TSCA before and after reform and some of the challenges EPA and industry face in implementing and complying with the new law.

 

Bio: Rich Engler is a Senior Chemist with Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C®) and The Acta Group (Acta®) where he provides chemistry expertise for a wide variety of global chemical regulatory issues.  Before joining B&C in 2015, he worked at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for 17 years, where he was a senior staff chemist in the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics. At EPA he reviewed numerous chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), led the Green Chemistry Program, including the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge, and worked on a variety of other projects, including the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators, Marine Debris and Trash-Free Waters, and cheminformatics.

Prior to joining EPA, Rich taught organic chemistry at the University of San Diego. He holds a Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from UCSD.

CSW March 2017 Dinner Meeting, Thursday, March 23

March CSW Dinner Meeting and Hillebrand Award Presentation

Date and Times:

  • Thursday, March 23, 2017
  • 6:00 p.m. Check-in and social hour
  • 6:30 p.m. Dinner
  • 7:15 p.m. Presentation

Cost:  $28 (Members and guests) / $14 (Students)

Location: ACS Headquarters, Marvel Hall, 1155 16th St., N.W., Washington, DC

Menu:  Prime Rib w/au jus, Twice Baked Potatoes, Tossed Salad, Artisan Bread
VEGETARIAN OPTION:  Cheese Manicotti, Grilled Vegetables, Tossed Salad, Garlic Bread
Dessert:  Mini Cookies and fresh fruit

RSVP by noon Tuesday, March 21 - csw@acs.org or by phone (messages only: 202-659-2650). Please provide the names in your party when you RSVP and indicate if you prefer the vegetarian option. The public is invited to attend. You may attend the talk only, but reservations are appreciated. Those who make a dinner reservation, but are unable to attend, should send a check for the cost of their meal to the CSW office.

Further details and directions can be found on the Capital Chemist website, http://www.capitalchemist.org. If you need any further information or would like to make a reservation, please contact the CSW office by email at csw@acs.org or by voicemail at 202.659.2650

Parking:  Parking is available in nearby commercial parking garages. Please be aware that garage closing times vary. Parking is also available on the street after 6:30 pm, but be aware that most parking meters are in effect until 10:00 pm and may be limited to 2 hours. You should check the individual meters for details and payment methods as some are no longer coin-operated.

Metro: Blue/Orange/Silver Line: McPherson Square or Farragut West. Red Line: Farragut North.

 _____________________________________________________

 

Greenhouse Gas Removal by its Transformation to Valuable Commodities

Stuart Licht, Department of Chemistry, George Washington University
Washington, DC, 20052, United States

As the levels of carbon dioxide increase in the Earth’s atmosphere, this greenhouse gas’s effects on climate change including species extinction, flooding, draught, famine and economic disruption become increasingly apparent. An incentive to remove CO2 is provided by a low energy, low cost, high yield conversion to valuable products such as carbon nanotubes. Displaying superior strength, conductivity, flexibility and durability, carbon nanotube (CNT) applications had been limited due to the cost intensive complexities of their synthesis. An inexpensive source of CNTs made from carbon dioxide will facilitate the rate of its adoption as an important societal resource for the building, aerospace, transportation, renewable energy, sporting and consumer electronics industries, while concurrently consuming carbon dioxide. We present an inexpensive, high-yield and scale-able synthesis of CNTs.

We show a new, unexpected chemistry for the effective capture of CO2 and its transformation at high yield and low energy, by dissolution in a molten carbonate electrolyte, and electrolysis splitting it to carbon nanotubes and oxygen.1-7 The CO2 reactant is directly absorbed from air (without the need for pre-concentration), or can be used and removed from industrial, home or transportation emissions.

We show that common metals act as CNT nucleation sites in molten media to efficiently drive the high yield electrolytic conversion of CO2 dissolved in molten carbonates to CNTs. We accomplish this by electrochemically reducing CO2 on steel electrodes in a molten carbonate electrolyte. The CNT structure is tuned by controlling the electrolysis conditions, such as the addition of trace common metals to act as CNF nucleation sites, the composition of the carbonate electrolyte, and the control of temperature and current density. Upward scalability of the process is demonstrated over several orders of magnitude.

The Licht group at GW University is in the midst of the semifinals of the Carbon XPrize (we are the C2CNF team at carbon.xprize.org), a global competition to demonstrate the most valuable product from the CO2 emissions of fossil fuel power plants. Our goal is to transform CO2 from a pollutant to a desired resource. Molten carbonate electrolysis production is significantly less expensive than contemporary CVD and polymer pulling methods to produce carbon nanotubes or nanofibers, and uses CO2 rather than organometallics or polymers as the reactant. An inexpensive source of CNTs has a large demand as a preferred, lighter weight, stronger replacements to metals and plastics, which (in addition to the battery, nanoelectronics and catalysis applications) can provide a large market to mitigate anthropogenic carbon dioxide.

  1. Ren, Li, Lau, Gonzalez-Urbina, Licht, One-pot synthesis of carbon nanofibers from CO2, Nano Letters, 15, 6142 (2015).
  2. Ren, Lau, Lefler, S. Licht, The minimum electrolytic energy needed to convert carbon dioxide by electrolysis in carbonate melts, J. Phys. Chem., C, 119, 23342 (2015).
  3. Licht, Douglas, Ren, Carter, Lefler, Pint, Carbon Nanotubes Produced from Ambient Carbon Dioxide for Environmentally Sustainable Lithium-Ion & Sodium-Ion Battery Anodes, ACS Central Science, 2, 162 (2015).
  4. Ren, Lau, Lefler, Licht, The minimum electrolytic energy needed to convert carbon dioxide by electrolysis in carbonate melts, J. Phys. Chem., C, 119, 23342 (2015).
  5. Lau, Dey, Licht, Thermodynamic assessment of CO2 to carbon nanofiber transformation for carbon sequestration in a combined cycle gas or a coal power plant, Energy Conservation and Management, 122, 400 (2016).
  6. Wu, Li, Ji, Liu, Li, Yuan, Zhang, Ren, Lefler, Wang, Licht, One-Pot Synthesis of Nanostructured Carbon Material from Carbon Dioxide via Electrolysis in Molten Carbonate Salts, Carbon, 6, 27760 (2016).
  7. Ren, Licht, Tracking airborne CO2mitigation and low cost transformation into valuable carbon nanotubes, Scientific Reports, 106, 208 (2016).

_____________________________________________________ 

 

Stuart Licht is an electrochemist and environmental chemist with ~400 papers and patents, focused on sustainability or fundamental chemistry including a variety of studies in the journals Science and Nature. Today he is a Dean's Research Professor in the Department of Chemistry at George Washington University. Stuart Licht served as a Program Director in the Chemistry Division of the National Science Foundation. An early pioneer in the field of photoelectrochemistry, Licht helped establish basic principles of the field as well as highest efficiency photoelectrochemical solar cells. His principles of STEP (solar thermal electrochemical processes) have led to the demonstration of the highest solar conversion of hydrogen, methane and syngas fuels from sunlight, air and water, as well as STEP CO2-free syntheses of ammonia, iron & steel, cement and organics. His research group has helped established the principals of multiple electron per molecule charge storage, including the unusual 11 electron VB2, and the hexavalent "super-iron," and molten air batteries. Licht has broadened the foundation of understanding of a wide range of fundamental physical, analytical, and environmental electrochemical phenomena ranging from generation/collection microelectrochemistry, to fundamentals of speciation, and water purification, and recently introduced a process to remove the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide to mitigate climate change by its transformation to carbon nanotubes. Recognitions include Licht’s BASF 150th Anniversary Electrochemical Storage Award, the Electrochemical Society Energy Technology Research Award, the Alcoa Research Award, GWU’s Trachtenberg Scholarship Award, the Gustella Award of the Technion, and Clark’s Carlson Endowed Chair in Chemistry.

CSW February 2017 Dinner Meeting

February CSW Dinner Meeting and College Achievement Awards

Undergraduates to be Honored at February Dinner Meeting

The College Chemistry Achievement Awards are presented annually by the Chemical Society of Washington to the outstanding seniors majoring in chemistry and biochemistry from each of the area colleges and universities.

DATE: Thursday, February 9, 2017

LOCATION: University of Maryland - Chemistry Building Atrium

TIME:

  • 6:00 p.m. Social Hour / Check-in / Dinner
  • 7:00 p.m. College Achievement Awards
  • 7:30 p.m. Speaker Presentation:

Recent Advances In the Analysis of Long Chain Omega-3 PUFA in fish Oil Dietary Supplements

Cynthia T. Srigley, Ph.D. US Food and Drug Administration,

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Office of Regulatory Science

COST:  

  • $24.00  Members / Guests
  • $12.00  Students

MENU:

Meal, provided by La Prima Catering, will feature a buffet of Chicken with mushrooms or Vegetarian pasta served with grilled vegetables, and includes Caesar salad, assorted dessert bars, and beverages.

Please make reservations by Tuesday, February 7, 2017, 12:00 noon, by contacting the CSW office: csw@acs.org or 202-659-2650 (messages only).  Please include the names of all members in your party, including spelling. The public is invited to attend. You may attend the talk only, but reservations are appreciated. Those who make a dinner reservation, but are unable to attend, should send a check for the cost of their meal to the CSW office.

Directions: From Baltimore Avenue (US Hwy 1), enter the UMD campus using Campus Drive. At the traffic circle, bear right onto Regents Drive. Parking is available in the Regents Drive parking garage across from the Chemistry building. Parking is unrestricted after 4:00 p.m. in the non-metered spaces. Campus Drive is also accessible from University Boulevard or Adelphi Road, on the west of campus.

Metro: Green line to College Park. The University runs a free shuttle bus from College Park Metro Station. The bus stops at the Regents Drive Garage across from the Chemistry Building. If you need a map, one is available from the University of Maryland website, at www.umd.edu.

Meal, provided by La Prima Catering, will feature a buffet of Chicken with mushrooms or Vegetarian pasta served with grilled vegetables, and includes Caesar salad, assorted dessert bars, and beverages.

_________________________________________________________

 

Recent Advances in the Analysis of Long Chain Omega-3 PUFA in Fish Oil Dietary Supplements

Cynthia T. Srigley, US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Office of Regulatory Science, College Park, MD 20740

Dietary supplements containing long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), such as those derived from fish oil, are frequently consumed in the United States (US) and other countries to support health and reduce the risk of chronic disease. The thriving market for fish oil supplements has been met with increasing concerns regarding the safety of such products, as well as issues of authenticity and deliberate mislabeling. Questions of accuracy in label declarations for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have also been raised. The US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) is currently evaluating rapid spectroscopic procedures for the determination of fats and fatty acids in foods and dietary supplements as alternatives to conventional gas chromatographic methods which are time-consuming, laborious, and involve hazardous solvents and reagents. Rapid methods are intended to reduce the total time of analysis, but they must also be as accurate, sensitive, and precise as current official methods. This presentation will focus on the development and validation of a novel Fourier-transform mid-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic method combined with partial least squares regression (PLSR) for the rapid quantitative prediction of long chain omega-3 PUFA in fish oil dietary supplements. This rapid screening method offers the potential to significantly improve sample-throughput and cost-efficiency for the routine monitoring of label declarations and product compositions.

 _________________________________________________________

 

College Chemistry Achievements Awards
February 9, 2017

The College Chemistry Achievement Awards are presented annually by the Chemical Society of Washington to the outstanding seniors majoring in chemistry and biochemistry from each of the area colleges and universities.  The following students received awards:

Alexander Rhoades, Rohith Rajasekaran, Kelly McKenna, Cassidy Hart, Sarah Burkhard

Absent: Pegah Bakhshi, Savanna Castello, Taylor Brooks Engdahl, Nicolas Omar Francone, Stefanos Ganotakis, Meagan Tomasso

College Achievement Awards (230 Kb, PDF) 

CSW January 2017 Dinner Meeting

Career Panel to Present at CSW January Dinner Meeting

The January meeting of the Chemical Society of Washington will have a different format than normal.  We will have a panel who will discuss career information that will be helpful to both those looking for employment, as well as those who might be looking for a new position. Each panelist will give a short, ten-minute presentation about their career path and career advice. A Q&A session with the panelists will follow. The panel will be moderated by Dr. Steven Meyers, Assistant Director of Career and Professional Advancement for the American Chemical Society.  After the panel discussion, there will be plenty of time for attendees to socialize and network with the panelists and other attendees. We encourage our members to attend and provide their wisdom and insight during the social time before and after the presentations.

Date:   Thursday, January 12

  • 6:00 p.m. Check-in and social hour
  • 6:30 p.m. Dinner
  • 7:15 p.m. Presentation

Cost:       $20 (Members and guests) / $10 (Students)

Location:  ACS Headquarters, Marvel Hall, 1155 16th St., N.W., Washington, DC 

Menu:  Meal will be catered by Fresh Connections, serving Chicken Noodle Soup and Barbecue Beef Brisket Sub. 

  • Vegetarian Option: Tomato Basil Soup and vegetarian panini. 
  • Meal includes French bread and parmesan chips as well as assorted cookies.

RSVP by noon Tuesday, January 10 - csw@acs.org or by phone (messages only: 202-659-2650)

Please provide the names in your party when you RSVP and indicate if you want the vegetarian option.  The public is invited to attend.

You may attend the talk only, but reservations are appreciated. Those who make a dinner reservation, but are unable to attend, should send a check for the cost of their meal to the CSW office.

Further details and directions can be found on the Capital Chemist website, http://www.capitalchemist.org

Parking:  Parking is available in nearby commercial parking garages. Please be aware that garage closing times vary. Parking is also available on the street after 6:30 pm, but be aware that most parking metersare in effect until 10:00 pm and may be limited to 2 hours. You should check the individual meters for details and payment methods as some are no longer coin-operated.

Metro: Blue/Orange/Silver Line: McPherson Square or Farragut West. Red Line: Farragut North.

Photo from the Luncheon for 50 Year CSW Members

CSW President Alan Anderson poses with the 50 year members who attended the recognition luncheon.Click to add text, images, and other content.

The 50 year members in attendance were:
Mrs. Lois Ann Beaver, Dr. Do Ren Chang, Dr. Regina J. Cody, Mrs. Mary E.  Cushmac,    Dr. Edgar S. Etz, Dr. Govind J. Kapadia, Dr. Michael King, Dr. John M. Malin, Dr. Richard I. Martinez, Dr. Stamatios Mylonakis, Dr. Annette Rosenblun, Dr. Thomas E. Ward and Dr. Wayne R. Wolf. 

50 Year CSW Memebers

Mr. Robert Paul Barron
Mrs. Lois Ann Beaver
Mr. Paul Henry Bickart
Dr. Francis John Biros
Dr. Frank Peter Boer
Dr. Robert Brien Callen
Dr. Do Ren Chang
Dr. Hao Chia Chen
Mr. Tony Man Kuen Chiu
Dr. Eugene Thomas Chulick
Dr. Regina Jacqueline Cody
Dr. Douglas M. Collins
Mr. Frank Garnett Cowherd
Mrs. Mary E. Cushmac
Dr. Leon Ashby Dickson
Ms. Janet S. Dodd
Dr. Edgar Silvester Etz
Mr. Ford Franklin Farabow
Dr. Henry L. Gabelnick
Dr. Govind J. Kapadia
Dr. Teddy M. Keller
Dr. Michael M. King
Dr. Lynn Alvin Larsen
Dr. Lester A. Lee
Dr. John Michael Malin
Dr. Richard I. Martinez
Dr. Anthony Brian Mauger
Dr. Stamatios Mylonakis
Dr. Mary C. Rose
Dr. Annette Rosenblum
Mr. Clyde Asao Takeguchi
Mr. Jeb S. Taylor
Dr. Thomas Edmund Ward
Dr. Wayne R. Wolf

60 Year CSW Members

Dr. Violet E.S. Baker
Dr. Jacob Block
Dr. Elise Ann Brown
Mr. Vito Anthony Cammarota
Mr. Michael Joseph Clifford
Dr. Joseph Emmet Earley
Dr. Robert J. Fallon
Dr. Robert Virgil Hemm
Dr. Merrill M. Hessel
Dr. Charlotte Marie Kraebel
Dr. Allan Henry  Laufer
Dr. Alan D. Lourie
Mr. Americo Patrick Silveri
Dr. Nora Tamberg

Upcoming Events

Wednesday, Oct 18 at 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Sunday, Oct 22 at 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday, Nov 20 at 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

The Capital Chemist

The Capital Chemist for November 2017.  See the Capital Chemist Page.

Volunteer Opportunities

CSW Volunteers needed for upcoming events. See the home page for details.

AAAS needs scientists, engineers and physicians to assist K-12 STEM Teachers

ReSET is a non-profit organization that places volunteer scientists and engineers in Washington DC area elementary school classrooms to lead students in science and math experiments.

CSW